Ijov’s Blog

December 24, 2009

Greek saint appears after death in Romania!


Orthodox Miracle – in Romania: The Greek saint Nectarios of Aegina (died in 1920) appears after death in Romanian village and starts working!

In a small village in Romania no priests existed and the residents went often to the Patriarch and demanded him to fulfill the empty spot. However the Patriarch did not have the means of satisfying the demand for a priest. The villagers went over and over again but their was nothing their Patriarch said that was any different… that he did not have any extra priests or else he would send one to the village.

Meanwhile people died unread (no services), others had relationships and children without marriage vows, the children and adults alike were unbaptized.

Then one day, outside of the Church a car pulled up and stopped and out stepped a priest shouting. The village was astonished.

The villagers went to the church to welcome him and asked him, “How did you come to the village after our Patriarch had said that he doesn’t have a priest to send us?”

The priest answered, “Isn’t that what you wished for? You wished for a priest? Now one has come.”

All the villagers were glad in the presence of the new priest.

The priest began immediately working. He went to all the graves and read the (exodio) prayers. He baptized and married everyone in the village and administered Holy Communion.

One day he invited all the villagers to church and told them, “I must leave now, my mission work is done.”

The villagers were saddened and confused by his announcement and asked, “Now that you came, you are leaving?”

However the priest didn’t change his mind and proceeded with his decision.

When the villagers realized that their wasn’t anything they could do, they thanked him.

After days, the villagers went to Patriarch and they thanked him for sending them a priest and to let him know that they would kindly appreciate it if he could send them another priest soon, but the Patriarch didn’t know anything.

He said to them I didn’t send a priest because I don’t have one, however let me check with the Protocingkelo to see if he had sent a priest to you to serve your needs.

He phoned the Protocingkelo but he too didn’t send anyone.

The Patriarch inquired, “What did this priest do for you?”

The villagers answered, “He married us, baptized us, performed funerals for our parents, he did what any other priest would have performed for us.”

Then the Patriarch asked if he gave them any papers or logged the mysteries.

“Of course,” said the villagers, “he gave us papers and he wrote them in the Churches books.”

“Then did anyone see what he wrote? And with what name he signed?”

“All the documents were written in Romanian and we are not well educated and the signature he signed in a language we have not seen before.”

The Patriarch requested they go bring the books in order to see who was this clergyman.

When they returned with the book the Patriarch remained speechless. He couldn’t believe his eyes.

Indeed all the documents were written in Romanian while his name was written in Greek with the name of his signature, Nektarios, Bishop of Pentapolis.

Source: Demetrios Velaoras

Glory to God! May St. Nektarios intercede for us!

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1 Comment »

  1. Thanks for this great website, it is very inspiring, in these troubled times, to be reminded of the strong faith which was once to be found everywhere in Christendom. May God restore peace and our faith to us all.

    Comment by Grace — February 4, 2011 @ 2:00 am | Reply


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